New Website!

09 February 2017

I moved my website from a PhP site hosted for free in Hostinger to a Jekyll powered site on Github Pages.

I discovered Jekyll some days ago, and found it amazing. It is everything I always tried to do with Php, but for static sites!

Making it short, Jekyll let you build a site in parts, with a common header and footer for each site, list blog entries or similar stuff. The difference with dynamic sites is that you have to build the site and then upload it, you can’t have it made in real time, and every interaction with the site must be made from the client side, so you can’t have the server checking credentials or anything like that, is all client side.

Yes, you can’t have an admin console or nothing like that, nor services used in Php like forwarding mail, changing site, using a database, but I was using wordpress for a personal blog, and, while wordpress brings a lot of flexibility, it wasn’t the flexibility I was looking for.

With Jekyll I can modify any site and transform it at will, changing even the smallest line of code.

I got so fond of it that I remade my whole site, with it’s 3 blogs and my portfolio, all in 4 different Jekyll powered sites.

By the way, I hated my old portfolio, I had to modify a bunch of lines, divs, articles and stuff for every new item I added. Now I only have to write a Markdown file and Ta-da! It’s already added.

Another thing I forgot, github pages. My free Hostinger site could receive very little visits per hour, so if an article of mine got a little popular the site would be down before 50 people could read it. This isn’t a problem with github pages, having a static site cost little to nothing to the server, who must only forward the html and it’s sub directories, making it really low cost of processing power.